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Someone Crown My Ass!
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Statement to XM Subscribers - The XM Nation

Everything we've done at XM since our first minute on the air is about giving you more choices. We provide more channels and music programming than any other network. We play all the music you want to hear including the artists you want to hear but can't find on traditional FM radio. And we offer the best radios with the features you want for your cars, homes, and all places in between.

We've developed new radios -- the Inno, Helix and NeXus -- that take innovation to the next level in a totally legal way. Like TiVo, these devices give you the ability to enjoy the sports, talk and music programming whenever you want. And because they are portable, you can enjoy XM wherever you want.

The music industry wants to stop your ability to choose when and where you can listen. Their lawyers have filed a meritless lawsuit to try and stop you from enjoying these radios.

They don't get it. These devices are clearly legal. Consumers have enjoyed the right to tape off the air for their personal use for decades, from reel-to-reel and the cassette to the VCR and TiVo.

Our new radios complement download services, they don't replace them. If you want a copy of a song to transfer to other players or burn onto CDs, we make it easy for you to buy them through XM + Napster.

Satellite radio subscribers like you are law-abiding music consumers; a portion of your subscriber fee pays royalties directly to artists. Instead of going after pirates who don't pay a cent, the record labels are attacking the radios used for the enjoyment of music by consumers like you. It's misguided and wrong.

We will vigorously defend these radios and your right to enjoy them in court and before Congress, and we expect to win.

Thank you for your support.




What's next? :dunno:
 

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Unregistered Abuser
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423 Posts
That's right.
Music industry doesn't want anybody recording music for free. Sirius pays a fee for this service, XM does not, that's all.
F... XM
 

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Someone Crown My Ass!
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Says there that they do :confused: Kind of weird like it was saying that people have been doing it forever so why now?
 

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Gotta love the autobahn!
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Why would Sirius subscribers get something from XM??

Please set me straight here... as I understand it, these radios record the music broadcast over XM radio and allows them to be played back at any time?? As I understand it, portable sat. radios can't get good reception indoors, so they record their music to allow uninterupted play. Where's the problem??

Like I said, perhaps I'm missing something.
 

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Gotta love the autobahn!
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2,726 Posts
Woosh said:
That's right.
Music industry doesn't want anybody recording music for free. Sirius pays a fee for this service, XM does not, that's all.
F... XM


??? Never seen someone so 'passionate' about sat radio.
 

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Gotta love the autobahn!
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Just went fishin' for info...

By Ted Bridis, The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — The recording industry sued XM Satellite Radio on Tuesday over its new iPod-like device that can store up to 50 hours of music, sending to the courts a roiling dispute over how consumers can legally record songs using next-generation radio services.
The federal lawsuit, filed in New York by the largest labels, accuses XM Satellite of "massive wholesale infringement" because its $400 handheld "Inno" device can record hours of music and automatically parse recordings by song and artist. The device is sold under the slogan, "Hear it, click it, save it."

The lawsuit seeks $150,000 in damages for every song copied by XM Satellite customers using the devices, which went on sale weeks ago. The company said it plays 160,000 different songs every month.

The lawsuit does not seek directly any payments from or sanctions against XM Satellite customers who record songs. But if the lawsuit were successful, it could raise the company's costs, which could be passed on to subscribers as higher monthly fees.

XM Satellite said Tuesday it will fight the lawsuit and accused the labels of using the courts as leverage during business negotiations.

"These are legal devices that allow consumers to listen to and record radio just as the law has allowed for decades," the company said in a statement. "The music labels are trying to stifle innovation, limit consumer choice and roll back consumers' rights to record content for their personal use."

XM Satellite has balked at the industry's efforts to collect expensive distribution licenses similar to those required for Internet downloading services, such as Apple Inc.'s iTunes. Its chief rival, Sirius Satellite Radio Inc., has already agreed to pay for such licenses to cover similar gadgets for its service.

XM Satellite's chairman, Gary Parsons, previously said requiring such licenses — in addition to broader performance licenses the company already pays — would represent "a new tax being imposed on our subscribers."

XM Satellite has compared its new device to a high-tech videocassette recorder, which consumers can legally use to record programs for their personal use. It also noted that songs stored on the device from its broadcasts can't be copied and can only be played for as long as a customer subscribes to its service.

The head of the music industry's trade group said the XM Satellite device is legally indistinguishable from iPods and other portable music players that work with downloading services.

"Yahoo!, Rhapsody, iTunes and Napster all have licenses," said Mitch Bainwol, chief executive for the Recording Industry Association of America. "There's no reason XM shouldn't as well."

XM subscribers pay $12.95 per month to listen to more than 170 channels of entertainment, sports and news programs, including 69 channels of different music genres without commercials.

A Washington-based consumers group, Public Knowledge, said the lawsuit threatens the rights of listeners to record music for their own use.

"The shame of the legal action, however, is that this is really a dispute between XM and the recording industry over licensing fees," the group's president, Gigi Sohn, said in a statement. "The companies should be left to figure out a solution without interference from the courts or from Congress."

Copyright 2006 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
 

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Someone Crown My Ass!
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7,081 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
gn85 said:
Why would Sirius subscribers get something from XM??

.
I didn't mean the XM version.... I meant Sirius version. I figured this was a across the board thing.
 

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I want a Z06
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Didn't see anything from either but my free XM trial ran out a few weeks ago. This is the exact reason I refuse to ever spend a penny buying Music, it would mean supporting these billionaires that have nothing better to do but annoy the **** out of the consumers with frivelous lawsuits. :mad: :rolleyes:
 

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Someone Crown My Ass!
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7,081 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
If XM doesn't win could you see even more stuff like this taking place? Kind of shocking!
 

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Save me from myself!
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TTA89 said:
Didn't see anything from either but my free XM trial ran out a few weeks ago. This is the exact reason I refuse to ever spend a penny buying Music, it would mean supporting these billionaires that have nothing better to do but annoy the **** out of the consumers with frivelous lawsuits. :mad: :rolleyes:

Yup, STICK IT TO THE MAN!!!

BTW, soon it will be illegal to hum a song w/o paying for it.
 
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