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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In an effort to stop a squealing PS pump system :eek!:, I've just replaced the PS pump with a new (re-manfg'd) AC/Delco unit from NOS4GN. :yup:

Before I start the car or attempt to bleed the air out of the system, can anyone offer any tips or helpful suggestions on the best way to do this. :dunno:

Thanks in advance.


dave
 

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power steering

In an effort to stop a squealing PS pump system :eek!:, I've just replaced the PS pump with a new (re-manfg'd) AC/Delco unit from NOS4GN. :yup:

Before I start the car or attempt to bleed the air out of the system, can anyone offer any tips or helpful suggestions on the best way to do this. :dunno:

Thanks in advance.


dave
Dave don,t start the car ,jack the front end up so both wheels are off the ground, then put some fluid in it then start to clock the wheels all the way from left to right or right to left with the cap off, you will have to put more fluid in it after a few times.I did this on my friends 69 Camaro and it worked great.
 

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X2. Keep checking the fluid level as you turn the steering back & forth with the wheels off the ground. When the fluid level stabalizes, and it looks like you don't have to add any more fluid, then you can lower the car to the ground, start the engine, try turning the steering back & forth, and check for leaks & noises. Good luck Dave.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks Gents.

Kinda what I thought, but wanted to double check.

thanks again.

dave
 

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Jedi Motorsports
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Do not jack the car up. Leave the wheels on the ground. You need pressure on the wheels to properly bleed the system
 

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Jedi Motorsports
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There has to be resistance when turning to make the pump work. Wheels off the ground is less resistance and you won't get all the air out
 

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Power Steering

There has to be resistance when turning to make the pump work. Wheels off the ground is less resistance and you won't get all the air out
I did this set up on a $150.000 dollar camero and it work just fine. Do either way it will work.
 

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Jedi Motorsports
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It will not work properly if wheels are of the ground. The fluid will not be flowing properly and there for you in the chance of not getting all the air out or potential causing premature wear to your new pump.

Put fluid in the res. start the car. Move the wheel from side to side, full turns. Turn the car off. Open the res cap. And wait for the bubbles to go away and repeat the process until it works properly
This is the proper way to do a ps bleed
 

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power steering

It will not work properly if wheels are of the ground. The fluid will not be flowing properly and there for you in the chance of not getting all the air out or potential causing premature wear to your new pump.

Put fluid in the res. start the car. Move the wheel from side to side, full turns. Turn the car off. Open the res cap. And wait for the bubbles to go away and repeat the process until it works properly
This is the proper way to do a ps bleed
What ever.
 

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With all due respect to everyone, I was a GM dealer tech for 16 years, and their procedure for bleeding a power steering system was to do the initial bleeding with the front wheels off the ground, so as not to put excessive strain on any part of the system until the majority of the air was out of the system. At that time, you could put the weight of the car back on the wheels, start the engine, and finish bleeding the system with the weight of the car on the front wheels and the engine running. The purpose of doing the initial bleeding with the engine off and the wheels off the ground is to try to get the majority of the air out of the power steering system prior to running the vehicle. That way, with most of the air out of the system, the car would only have to bleed a small amount of air out while it is running, thereby avoiding any possible damage to the system that might occur from having a large amount of air circulating through the system with the engine running and the weight of the vehicle on the wheels. As I said, that was the official GM procedure for bleeding a power steering sytem. I used it for years, and it worked well.
 
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