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Greatest ever?

  • Josh Gibson

    Votes: 2 6.9%
  • Barry Bonds

    Votes: 3 10.3%
  • Ruth

    Votes: 17 58.6%
  • Oh

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Aaron

    Votes: 5 17.2%
  • Other (specify)

    Votes: 2 6.9%
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Josh Gibson - the biggest question mark. He played in the ***** Leagues, never got a chance to play in the majors, but he might, if he had been given the chance, proved to be the best ever. Sad that we will never know. Many that saw him play thought he may very well have been the best.

Bonds - Steroid era will taint his records. Great player, but how great?

Ruth - Perhaps the most valuable player to ever play the game. Before he was a great home run hitter, he was considered one of the best left-handed pitchers of his time. A great homerun hitter and a left handed pitcher! The games most charismatic character, ever, but how would his off-field antics have been accepted in this day and age?

Sadaharu Oh - Japanese homer champ. Would not have hit nearly the number of homers had he played in the US major leagues, but would have been a great hitter nevertheless. Probably underrated as a player.

Hank Aaron - he gets my vote. No drugs, faced high level of competition, class act all the way. A great hitter, not just a great home run hitter.

Other - write-in candidate. I wonder how many Ted Williams would have hit in the years he missed during the War?
 

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I vote for Josh Gibson because he never had a chance, but, I think he would have been one of the greatest all around.

Who knows what Mantle would have done on two good legs, or what Ted would have done if he had not enlisted.

Too many unknowns. :dunno:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Satchel Paige may have been the greatest pitcher ever too, and he rivaled Ruth in the charisma department.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Gibson was also a very good catcher. One wonder how much money he would make in todays game. I'm guessing a lot of it. :yup:
 

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Ruth. That guy could party all night..be hungover..and he did it for many years.
 

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First off, you have to consider and compare the impact each player had relative to his own era. Ruth played about a third of his career in the deadball era. Ruth lead the league (both leagues) something like twelve times and the years he hit 59 and 60 was more than most teams had. Not to mention that previous to WW2 they only used 2 balls for the whole game making it more difficult to hit homers in the later innings with a soft, dirty ball in the twilight hours.

The parks were also a lot deeper, even Yankee Stadium, than they are today.

Ted Williams was the greatest hitter ever, but not Homerun Hitter. An arguement can be made that had he played in Yankee Stadium, with the short porch in right, he would have a lot more to his total of 521. Ted lost six years in his prime and those projections take him into the high 600's.

No question Aaron did it the hard way. He never hit more than 47 in a season, was hated by most of America, and played for some bad teams. Playing for bad teams, Aaron probably did not get as many good pitches as Ruth did with Gehrig behind him. However, when Ruth retired no one had half as many homers as he did.

Ruth's impact was just too big, like his torso.

Bonds? pfft. We're talking "natural" hitters right?

They say Gibson was the greatest, but how much emotion is attached to that claim. I know he is attributed with 800 or so, but that is not documented and his career was cut short at 37, so that number is doubtful.

Oh? I guess, but that is a different game with a different set of values and playing standards. He warrants being on the list, just not number one.


Next question...
 

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RobsIron said:
Ruth. That guy could party all night..be hungover..and he did it for many years.
:yup:

My favorite Ruth story:

While out barnstorming, Ruth and Gehrig were rooming together. Gehrig stays in the room listening to Opera and reading books while Ruth is out on the town. Ruth comes back to the Room at about 10:00 with two girls in tow.

Ruth goes in his room and proceeds to show them his 'bat'. After much ado, Ruth comes out of the room and smokes a cigar. Gehrig says good night to Ruth and heads for bed.

They get up in the morning for the game and Gehrig says "Boy you were loud all night. How many times did you do that?!"

Ruth shrugs his shoulders and says "I don't know. How many cigars are in the ash tray?"

There were six. :headbang: :poon: :usa:

and THAT is why Ruth is the GREATEST!
 

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Racer X said:
First off, you have to consider and compare the impact each player had relative to his own era. Ruth played about a third of his career in the deadball era. Ruth lead the league (both leagues) something like twelve times and the years he hit 59 and 60 was more than most teams had. Not to mention that previous to WW2 they only used 2 balls for the whole game making it more difficult to hit homers in the later innings with a soft, dirty ball in the twilight hours.

The parks were also a lot deeper, even Yankee Stadium, than they are today.

Ted Williams was the greatest hitter ever, but not Homerun Hitter. An arguement can be made that had he played in Yankee Stadium, with the short porch in right, he would have a lot more to his total of 521. Ted lost six years in his prime and those projections take him into the high 600's.

No question Aaron did it the hard way. He never hit more than 47 in a season, was hated by most of America, and played for some bad teams. Playing for bad teams, Aaron probably did not get as many good pitches as Ruth did with Gehrig behind him. However, when Ruth retired no one had half as many homers as he did.

Ruth's impact was just too big, like his torso.

Bonds? pfft. We're talking "natural" hitters right?

They say Gibson was the greatest, but how much emotion is attached to that claim. I know he is attributed with 800 or so, but that is not documented and his career was cut short at 37, so that number is doubtful.

Oh? I guess, but that is a different game with a different set of values and playing standards. He warrants being on the list, just not number one.


Next question...


Wow, That was a great little read.Very nice.
Jim.
 

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I'd go with Ted Williams, even though he may not have the numbers he was my favorite.

PS.....Koufax!!!!!!
 

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"There were no American League stadiums where Mantle played where he did not hit a home run of at least 450 feet to both the left and right sides of the field."


Stupid question too. :D
 

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salvageV6 said:
"There were no American League stadiums where Mantle played where he did not hit a home run of at least 450 feet to both the left and right sides of the field."


Stupid question too. :D
Mickey was one of the very few that could hit line drive HR's. I seen him in Yankee Stadium as a kid hitting shots at the end of his career low enough that the pitcher and 2nd baseman jumped to catch the ball. :sw:
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Oh boy! Next thing you know Mickey will have hit a groung ball that was going so fast it went thorough the outfield fence and was last seen headed towaed Canada. :D
 

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Zap said:
Not enough buttons for you? :cool:
I was trying to conserve with my reply anticipating your next poll.


Mickey was one of the very few that could hit line drive HR's.

Sorry, NO Yankees are eligible in this poll... :D
 

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Zap said:
Oh boy! Next thing you know Mickey will have hit a groung ball that was going so fast it went thorough the outfield fence and was last seen headed towaed Canada. :D
The only thing heading to Canada is gothmog. :sw:
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I thought he was headed south to move in with Hugo Chavez. :usa:
 

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I've often wondered if it's really fair to compare anything from one era to another. Not to pick on Babe Ruth, but can anyone say, with any kind of certainty, how well he could hit a modern-day pitch? I don't even know what kind of speeds an average fastball is clocking nowadays. Watching old (helmet-less) hockey also makes me wonder if 'Rocket Richard' could even keep up with some of the newer players. Seems that year by year the competition continues to push the game to a whole new level.

Personally, I think Reggie Jackson has to be included in this comparison - Zap's gotta start over. 8P
 
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