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when u apply dielectric grease to plug wires boots do you just put it at the bottom of the boot or inside the boot? also, what about the connectors where it hooks up to the coil pack terminals?

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I've only put a little on the top of the spark plug, and on the coil pack tops, where the plug wires connect to.
 

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Just like a proctologist, inside the boot hole.


Yeah I wear rubber gloves too.....


Never on the electronic contacts, makes the patient "jumpy" when you do this.
 

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Another trick that I now do, after hearing of several others who recommended it, is to squirt some WD-40 into the boot before putting the wires on. Works well!

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The grease is to promote the electrical connection. Soooo ya want to put it on the electrical connections, i.e. the metal part like the plug tip and coil pack tips. I'm thinking the WD-40 defeats the purpose of the boot to help keep the wire on! Just my opinion and we all now what they are like and everyone has got one!
 

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Actually dielectric grease does not conduct electricity and is used to prevent spark jumping down the inside of the boot and also to make removal of the wire/boot easier later on. Therefore do not use it on the metal contacts as it is non conductive.
Hope this clarifies a common misconception.
 

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Yep, he may be Bad but he is right!
 

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I did a search on the subject and found some amazing things regarding dielectric grease.

Ever wonder how they fill up tail light sockets with that crap and relay connectors and all and still get the proper connection?

You actually are supposed to put it on the connectors themselves. The tight fit of the electrical connector should actually displace the grease where it won't affect the connection but will eliminate moisture and oxygen in the area preventing corrosion.

I always wondered how the tail lights and relays worked with all that goop in there...

I still am not going to put any on the inside of the spark plug metal connector, just fill up the boot a little more.


Just my .02 from reading a bit about it.
 

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Guys, just my O2, and you can take it for what it is worth. I use the dielectric grease on all my connections and it does work great. It keeps out the water and crap, along with making the connection secure. As for not conducting electricity, I will have to go back and check my school notes as I thought it did aid as a conductor. But hey, what the heck if it works I am in.

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A dielectric will conduct electrical force but not current. The material between layers of a capacitor is composed of a dielecric material.
 

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Electrical force over a given area is current.
 

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but not thru a dielectric!




Find in this article
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Dielectric



Dielectric, or insulator, substance that is a poor conductor of electricity and that will sustain the force of an electric field passing through it. This property is not exhibited by conducting substances. Two oppositely charged bodies placed on either side of a piece of glass (a dielectric) will attract each other, but if a sheet of copper is instead interposed between the two bodies, the charge will be conducted by the copper.

In most instances the properties of a dielectric are caused by the polarization of the substance. When the dielectric is placed in an electric field, the electrons and protons of its constituent atoms reorient themselves, and in some cases molecules become similarly polarized. As a result of this polarization, the dielectric is under stress, and it stores energy that becomes available when the electric field is removed. The polarization of a dielectric resembles the polarization that takes place when a piece of iron is magnetized. As in the case of a magnet, a certain amount of polarization remains when the polarizing force is removed. A dielectric composed of a wax disk that has hardened while under electric stress will retain its polarization for years. Such dielectrics are known as electrets.

The effectiveness of dielectrics is measured by their relative ability, compared to a vacuum, to store energy, and is expressed in terms of a dielectric constant, with the value for a vacuum taken as unity. The values of this constant for usable dielectrics vary from slightly more than 1 for air up to 100 or more for certain ceramics containing titanium oxide. Glass, mica, porcelain, and mineral oils, often used as dielectrics, have constants ranging from about 2 to 9. The ability of a dielectric to withstand electric fields without losing insulating properties is known as its dielectric strength. A good dielectric must return a large percentage of the energy stores in it when the field is reversed. The fraction lost through so-called electric friction is called the power factor of the dielectric. Dielectrics, particularly those with high dielectric constants, are used extensively in all branches of electrical engineering, where they are employed to increase the efficiency of capacitors. See Capacitor; Electricity; Insulation.

HOW TO CITE THIS ARTICLE
"Dielectric," Microsoft® Encarta® Online Encyclopedia 2001 http://encarta.msn.com © 1997-2001 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
 

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I was thinking about the magnetic force defintion of current anyway, it don't apply here that's for sure.

Neat article.

Did another search on the grease thing and couldn't find the first article I read about displacing the grease.

Going back to look again.
 

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The only thing I remembered was that it was the insulator in caps and it passed force...figured I better go online and look it up before I said something really wrong..


When I have used the grease, I just wiped some on the plug insulator and around the coil terminals so the boots would not stick...
 
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