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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've noticed some pulsating when braking, and it didn't feel like a pad or anything, so I checked my rear tires with the 255/50's mounted on GTA rims and noticed some tire rub against the frame. There is plenty of space there when you look at it, but that must change when the car is moving. Could bad shocks or something allow the frame to contact the tire? Thanks

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George Macedo
87 GN
Central Florida GN & T-Type Club est. 1990
 

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Hmm... are your directional tires still on backwards? I don't know the ramificactions of running a tire like that the opposite direction for which it was designed..

Are your rotors in need of turning?? I know this problem is fairly common, mine were once horrible, and a good turning fixed the ride..

Just thinking out loud..

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Email Address: mailto:[email protected][email protected]</A>


Current Combo: Stock Turbo, V4, MSD50's, TH DP, JayJackson 62mm TB, 16position MaxEffort Chip.
12.35 & 108.39 Street Trim.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Ha, no the tire-direction problem has been solved. I'll inspect the break area this weekend and get back with you.

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George Macedo
87 GN
Central Florida GN & T-Type Club est. 1990
 
G

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Originally posted by batmansbuick:
I've noticed some pulsating when braking, and it didn't feel like a pad or anything, so I checked my rear tires with the 255/50's mounted on GTA rims and noticed some tire rub against the frame. There is plenty of space there when you look at it, but that must change when the car is moving. Could bad shocks or something allow the frame to contact the tire? Thanks

Upon original assembly, many T/Rs were not perfectly centered on the frame. This is more noticable in the rear where the frame is located closer to the wheels and tires.
Even with those type rims, and they should be fronts, not rears, if the body was centered, there should be no rubbing. The rubbing occurs when turning, the body rocks, and the faster the turn, the more rubbing occurs.
You have two possible solutions.
The first being a visit to a frame shop, loosen all the body mount bolts and shift the body to true alignment to the frame.
Second is, on the side rubbing on the frame, get a set of wheel spacers from Jegs or Summit. They come in three widths, so you need to estimate how much more spacing will be required. You will probably have to install the longer wheel studs to cover the added spacing, so the nuts can tightened safely with all the stud thread covered by nut thread.
When installing the correct width spacer, and to avoid an out of balance condition, center the spacer on the hub, using 5 pieces of 1/2" long rubber hose inserted on each stud, thick enough to permit centering and securing the spacer in the correct rotation position.

Ron




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Ron's Custom Automotive
Certified NJ Emission Repair Facility
1-800-718-7667
GSCA # 2306 / PR Director
www.ronscustomauto.com
[email protected]
 

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A little trick I was taught by an undercar specialist was to try swapping your upper control arms from side to side and see if that helps things.Apparently QC on these cars wasn't the greatset on these cars from the factory.As for the brakes, find yourself a clear stretch of road and apply the emergency brake while driving between 30 & 40 mph[be sure to hold the e-brake handle in the released position when you do this].If you feel a pulsing in the e-brake pedal,your rear drums are out of round.Good luck.
 
G

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Originally posted by batmansbuick:
I've noticed some pulsating when braking, and it didn't feel like a pad or anything


Usually, a warped rotor, when braking, will cause a vibration in the steering wheel or you can sometimes even see and or feel the front end vibrating.
If a drum is warped or out of round, when braking, you can feel the vibration / pulsation with your butt and in the seat.
It's not as common to develop brake pulsation within the rear drums as opposed to the front rotors.
Hard and erratic braking along with driving thru puddles of water or slush and have it splash and cold shock the rotors are the two major reasons for rotor warpage. Rotors are always hot during drivng, due to some pad drag and after hard braking, they can get extremely hot.
Other things like sluggish calipers or improper brake work practices also contribute.

Ron



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Ron's Custom Automotive
Certified NJ Emission Repair Facility
1-800-718-7667
GSCA # 2306 / PR Director
BCA # 26330
www.ronscustomauto.com
[email protected]
 
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